EMAH THE LABEL

BY ELLIE HOTTINGER

YOUR GUIDE TO EVERYTHING EMAH DOES TO BE SUSTAINABLE:

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If you’ve been following along for some time you’ve likely gathered that ETL is on a mission to be a sustainable brand without subjecting to traditional practices of larger retailers. 

I throw out bits and pieces of ETL’s mission here and there but I want you to know exactly what your are supporting and exactly what I do to make sure that the practices of this business align with the mission I am projecting. So here is your cheat sheet: 

FABRIC RECYCLING:

Not every inch of fabric can be made into ETL garments, but every inch CAN be used for something. After the patterns are cut out, the pieces that are too small to use can still be recycled and used for a variety of things from stuffing punching bags to grinding to a pulp for paper. Most recently I’ve partnered with local textiles artists, Maggie Dimmick of Ethel Studio. <— Go check out her work! 

Speaking of recycling fabric into paper, ETL’s hang tags are made from exactly that. Our friends at MOO have created a recycled product option made from 100% cotton t-shirts—talk about coming full circle. 

EAT ORGANIC? WEAR ORGANIC: 

Organic cotton production is chemical free, and therefore does not contribute to water contamination.  It also uses less carbon, less fuel, & less energy. Bonus effect? Organic textiles are more allergy friendly than synthetic. 

DYE FREE IS THE WAY TO BE: 

ETL does not use any dyes, hence a lot of neutral & natural colored garments. (Not mad about that.) Garments made with colored fabrics means they were sourced from dead stock fabrics, which you can read more about below. 

DEAD STOCK ROCKS: 

Dead stock fabrics come from larger retailers & manufacturers who have excess material and do not want it to go to waste.  Critics of dead stock fabrics argue it is not truly sustainable because it is “supporting producing more than one needs in the first place”.  While I understand this position, I politely side with it being a sustainable option, especially as industry giants work to shift their practices in this #fashionrevolution. There are fabulous companies making it their mission to eliminate this waste and find good homes for these materials to be given a new life. *Enter Emah The Label.* 

LOCALITY: 

I talk a lot about #supportinglocal but it’s not just about the end product. Sourcing materials from local vendors on the back end cuts down on excessive shipping, sampling, and processes that impact the environment.  The same applies to producing garments locally as well, plus there are far less outrageous overseas minimums one must meet. 

SMALL SCALE: 

Creating only what you need not only eliminates inventory chaos but also saves materials and cuts down on wasted items. This is where ETL’s made to order method comes into play, and also why you won’t typically see sales on the site—there’s very little I need to get rid of ; ) Sale seeker hack: join Emah The List for 10% off your first order, as well as exclusive offers for subscribers. 

Now go tell your friends!